My Letter To Santa

Dear Santa Claus

I wanted to write this letter to you right before you took off on your journey around the world to deliver Christmas presents to kids. I hope I have made your ‘nice’ list this year because I really don’t want to end up with a stocking full of coal – coal is sure not a pretty present inside Christmas stockings. I haven’t got anything special planned for Christmas Eve, except to eat really tasty food and watch Disney videos, with my best mate – if I don’t feel too sleepy we might hang out.

I think that on Christmas Day, I will be cooking egg but not eggnog because I wasn’t in the mood for something sweet unless ofcourse if it is sweetened milk. I wanted to make scrambled eggs with a lot of veggies (especially tomatoes because my dog loves it) and the egg-dish looks so amazing, I feel like a mini-chef. Now if only I had a white chef hat…it would complete the picture in my head that I really am a great cook.

I wished and wished and wished that this holiday season would be the most perfect ever and so far so good. I really love that it is a carol-filled atmosphere in my house this year because nothing spells more Christmas-like than amazing Christmas carols. I want a lot of presents…and it’s not much: I just want my choo choo train to be happy, magical and filled with laughter for forever. Other than that, I want to have time to watch the telly sometimes even though my studies keep me so busy, and I also want to…have a great 2017. Merry Christmas!

With Love, and Hugs for Rudolph, the reindeer

OA

A Chore Called ‘Thanksgiving Dinner’

It is not too tough to work a plan out to prepare for one of the grandest meals of the year

The Thanksgiving weekend is almost here. It’s hard to not spend time daydreaming about a delicious turkey roast, and potatoes cooked to perfection every day of the hour. But sometimes cooking for a massive meal always sounds harder than it is:

  • Must wash turkey properly before cooking
  • Must always keep an eye on the cooking hob
  • Need to marinate prawns, the night before to cook over the weekend – I mean, does that sound inviting? Giving up your first proper evening in front of the television for marinating prawns that you won’t even be digging into until at least tomorrow evening?

It’s not hard. A little discipline goes a long way. In my mind, I have always associated thanksgiving dinner with friends. There is a lot to be thankful for in the world and every year expressing some of it shows you in a candour spirit I believe, for people who love you. As an animal-lover, thanksgiving for me is incomplete without thinking about my dog(s), and for all animals in the world, and for them I am thankful every year – it’s one of the rare regulars on my annual list. I feel it rings in a perfect family spirit that way, and Thanksgiving, like all major holidays can also be considered entirely “a family holiday”.

However, in the United States not everyone likes to think so-traditional-in-everything. I like to call it a more British or Asian understanding that holidays mean spending them with family a little bit, and quality time with your pet(s) a lot. Nowadays, semi-takeaway food is substituting homecooked Thanksgiving meals. Even as a student I cannot imagine having “a half-prepared meal chucked into the oven and voila…done” during the holidays because no matter what student cooking looks like, it’s still an edition of a Thanksgiving meal. It’s impossible to believe that lives in metropolitans can be so busy and full of little things to do everyday that actually cooking a meal seems so very hard to fit in.

For a Thanksgiving meal, there are some basics that must be followed to make the whole process as simple as possible:

  • Roast a turkey
  • Invite your friends for a meal
  • Do the cranberry sauce (it should be simpler than making a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice without a blender)
  • Prepare the gravy
  • Make mashed potatoes

My favourite part about the meal is undoubtedly the roast turkey, but getting together with mates + the nice cold that this time of the year always rings in, is always a great reason to look forward to Thanksgiving Day.

 

Raya is almost here….

July has set out to be a rollercoaster of celebrations. If it isn’t the 4th of July celebrations that took place recently in the United States of America, it is the upcoming celebrations for “Raya” in Malaysia. Raya (known in other Commonwealth countries as “Eid”), is a big part of the calendar in Malaysia. Hari Raya is a prominent holiday because it signals the end of Ramadan (one entire month of fasting) for Muslims.

Oil lamps are also lit inside homes in Malaysia to observe the occasion, from the 20th day of Ramadan, as people dress in new clothes for Raya to celebrate with friends and families.

Raya: Food

 

I have been celebrating Raya practically all my life, but since I was a little girl, my favourite time of the year has always been Christmas. The most interesting thing about Raya to me, is the food; the food that you eat in Raya is superlative and delicious. I would personally recommend meat floss, saviyaan, satay and kebabs.

What Type Of Suitcase-Packer Are You?

When you prepare to go on a holiday, how much thought do you put into your luggage? 

I am an Over-Packer

A packer who does not know how to sort their items in a
luggage is a confused packer. Their minds are filled with questions over what
to pack and what to not. But it need not be this way because travelling to
Valencia in Spain should be looked as a fun experience, and packing for it
needs to double up as something of that sort too. 

An over-packer however is
always busy pondering over the latest questions about a trip: where to go for
fancy-dress parties? Should I pack a raincoat and an umbrella? What if I have a
lot of social events to attend and not enough outfit changes for me through
them? Over-packers like to think that they have thought of it all when it came
to packing “the essentials”, aside from maybe how to close that luggage now
before taking it with them to the airport.

I only have LV Carry-Ons

A carry-on packer can also be termed as a light packer. They
like to plan ahead and organize all of their items. As minimalist travelers,
they can be practical and versatile with their clothing choices. They are
effortless in the concept of mix-and-match with all of their essentials. They
dislike having to lug around a lot of Louis Vuitton cases and check them into
the baggage compartment and then maybe even think of all of the extra fees they
have to now pay for not having thought through packing before arriving at the airport.

Smart Packers

Most travellers worry about packing – it is almost a
universal worry. When you are a smart packer, as a traveler you will have all
of the hacks to packing. You will know how to fold your socks into your shoes
to save space, you will Sellotape your shampoo and conditioner bottles, just so
they are not everywhere inside your luggage, and all over your beloved Dartmouth
green jumper, when you have finally arrived at your favourite hotel at the
Trafalgar, and you will have your jewellery items untangled and strung through
straws – ready to wear to the first tourist spot you want to visit.

The Last-minute Packer

Life with a last-minute packer must be the most hectic idea
imaginable – they always avoid packing for a holiday. They have no organized lists
or list of items to go through so when it is time to pack they are running all
over the house trying to finish the task and also avoid missing their flight.
Just like a tornado, the packer is busy throwing anything he can think off into
his suitcase at the last minute – depending on how much practice he has got he
can have everything done right or he might just remember on the plane that he
has forgotten to bring polos or any ties.